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Strike while the iron is hot

Strike while the iron is hot

The blacksmith has a piece of iron which he wishes to make into some useful article. For this purpose he puts it in a bed of burning coals, which we kept alive and glowing by a huge pair of bellows. The iron, after awhile, becomes so hot that it is as soft as lead, and is easily hammered into any shape that is desired. The blacksmith now draws it from the fire with his tongs, places it on his anvil, and while it remains hot, strikes with his hammer upon it as fast as he can, as it grows cooler and. harder every moment it is out of the fire. Whatever is done, must be done while the iron is hot, otherwise all his hammering will prove of no avail. Read More →

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